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domingo, 18 de septiembre de 2011

Los Angeles Times Photographic Archives


June 5, 1968: Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy lies on the floor at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles moments after he was shot in the head. He had just finished his victory speech upon winning the California primary.


April 19, 1966: Actress Julie Christie meets a throng of photographers and reporters at the Beverly Hills Hotel the morning after winning her Oscar for “Darling,” in which she portrayed a model in London’s swinging ’60s.


April 9, 1945: Betty Hutton, seated on the piano, and other aspiring starlets sing with troops at the Hollywood Canteen, which was started by Bette Davis and others in 1942. The canteen on Cahuenga Boulevard became a fixture in Hollywood during World War II as a place soldiers and sailors on leave could relax and mingle with celebrity volunteers.


Oct. 24, 1985: Richard Ramirez, known as the Night Stalker, flashes a pentagram drawn on his palm in a Los Angeles courtroom. Ramirez was tried in a string sexual assaults and murders that terrorized the Los Angeles area in 1985. In many cases, he entered homes at night through open windows or doors. Spray-painted pentagrams — a Satanist symbol — were found on the walls of the some of victims’ homes.


Oct. 4, 1977: Cars jam the parking lots of Dodger Stadium for the first game of the National League Championship Series playoffs between the Dodgers and Philadelphia Phillies. This image was taken about 5 p.m.


March 2, 1970: Cleave Sharry plates Oscar statuettes in layers of copper, nickel and gold. For the 35th year, Dodge Trophies Inc. of Los Angeles made the 40 gold Oscars given out in 1970.


April 2, 1954: A couple is photographed moments after learning that their 19-month-old child had been swept out to sea at Hermosa Beach. That morning, Times photographer Jack Gaunt was at his beachfront home when he heard a neighbor shout, “Something’s happening on the beach!” Gaunt grabbed his Rolliflex camera and headed toward the shoreline. His photograph appeared on the front page of The Times the next day. The image won the 1955 Pulitzer Prize for press photography; the Pulitzer committee called the photo “poignant and profoundly moving.” But for Gaunt, the image was hard to bear at first, his daughter recalled in Gaunt’s 2007 Times obituary.


April 24, 1973: From left, Leonard Nimoy (Spock), DeForest Kelley (Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy) and William Shatner (Capt. James T. Kirk) — stars of hit TV series “Star Trek” — record their voices in a Los Angeles studio for “Star Trek: The Animated Series,” which premiered in September 1973. A total of 22 episodes were produced and broadcast in 1973-74.


Jan. 1, 1915: An ostrich named Cloudburst pulls Virginia Moon in her L.A. Ostrich Farm entry in the Rose Parade. Before football became the Rose Bowl tradition, ostriches were raced after the parade.


Jan. 5, 1968: Mr. Blackwell, a onetime actor, model and designer turned celebrity fashion critic, nominates the 10 worst dressed women in the world for the fashion press — and suggests an alternative, right. Mr. Blackwell, born Richard Sylvan Selzer, became a household name from the 1960s to the ’80s with his finger-wagging fashion reports.


Sept. 15, 1959: Singer Bing Crosby smiles for his first and only daughter, Mary Frances, held by nurse Sadie Neal at Queen of Angels Hospital in Los Angeles. Bing already had five sons, and in 1961 a sixth, Nathaniel, was born. Mary Crosby grew up to become an actress, starring as Kristin Shepard in the TV series “Dallas.” The character of Kristin Shepard was revealed as the person who shot J.R. Ewing in the classic “Who Done It” episode that aired Nov. 21, 1980.


Jan. 12, 1989: President Reagan gives a final salute to service members during a farewell ceremony at Andrews Air Force Base outside Washington. 


June 6, 1978: Howard Jarvis, anti-tax activist and chief sponsor of the controversial Proposition 13, signals victory as he casts his vote at the Fairfax-Melrose precinct in Los Angeles. The measure, which placed limits on property taxes, passed by a 2-1 margin.


January 21, 1977: Mothers and children protest against mandatory busing in front of Sunland Elementary School. About 35 demonstrators appeared in front of five area schools.


Aug. 29, 1970: A deputy, standing at far right, watches as a young man throws a bottle during rioting in East Los Angeles. 


Aug. 13, 1965: National Guard troops secure a stretch of 103rd Street, dubbed Charcoal Alley, in Watts to help Los Angeles authorities restore order. The riots, sparked by the arrest of a black motorist for drunk driving, lasted for six days. After the violence, 34 people, 25 of them black, were dead and more than 1,000 were injured.


June 22, 1940: Actress Shirley Temple appears at a two-hour nationwide radio benefit for the American Red Cross Mercy Fund. More than 50 celebrities, including Bing Crosby and Mickey Rooney, helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars to help war refugees in Europe.


February 4, 1976: Covina cattle rancher Raleigh Waller gets excited as light rain begins to fall. For some 40 days and 40 nights, no winter rains had fallen in L.A., so any moisture was news.


November 1975: A documentary film crew focuses on Arnold Schwarzenegger as he does a light workout at Gold’s Gym in Venice before the International Federation of Bodybuilder’s Mr. Olympia contest. On November 9, 1975, Schwarzenegger won the Mr. Olympia crown – his sixth straight year. Then he retired from bodybuilding competition.


June 22, 1978: Marine Reservists during a training amphibious landing at Coronado capture one spectator — a Navy specialist getting some rays after planting dummy explosives.


May 24, 1970: … and action! Actors play victims of a bombing on Hollywood Boulevard as startled residents watch from the side. The scene was part of a movie shoot for “Alex in Wonderland,” which starred Donald Sutherland and Ellen Burstyn.


Dec. 8, 1977: George McClintock, who has been on the job 16 years at Santa's Village in the San Bernardino National Forest, counsels Amy Spain, 2, of Riverside, about her Christmas list. McClintock's beard is his own. 


Jan. 18, 1986: A spotlight captures the landing of the space shuttle Columbia at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert after a Florida touchdown was canceled because of rain. 


March 23, 1970: Sculptor Claude K. Bell with his 45-foot- tall, 150-foot-long brontosaur in Cabazon next to Interstate 10. Bell, a Knott’s Berry Farm sculptor and portrait artist, opened the Wheel Inn cafe in 1958. To attract customers, he began building dinosaurs.


Jan. 31, 1982: James Brown shakes hands with enthusiastic fans at the end of the singer’s triumphant show at the Country Club in Reseda.


JFK takes a swim.


May 24, 1981. Denny Matasci, holder of world from jumping record of 20 feet, 3 inches, cheers on his champion E. Davey Croakett, in what clearly is a giant leap for frogkind. 


Aug. 9, 1962: Jackie Gleason with train “conductor” Los Angeles Times Hollywood columnist Hedda Hopper during his $80,000 cross-country excursion.


April 24, 1982: Actor Robert Culp, right, spoofs his own TV show, “I Spy,” on “Saturday Night Live,” with comedian Eddie Murphy playing Bill Cosby’s character. In “I Spy,” which ran from 1965 to 1968, Culp’s and Cosby’s characters were secret agents traveling the world under the guises of a tennis pro and his trainer.


April 30, 1978: Los Angeles Aztecs’ Ron Davies gets a kick in the face from Oakland Stompers’ Paki Paunocich. A cut and blooded Davies, left, remained in the game.


April 12, 1989: Shafts of sunlight are the only illumination for a Metro Rail station under construction at 7th and Flower streets. The 4.4-mile segment of the Metro Red Line, including this station, opened on Jan. 30, 1993.


Oct. 15, 1988: Kirk Gibson celebrates as he rounds the bases after his two-run pinch-hit homer off Oakland reliever Dennis Eckersley, giving the Dodgers a stunning 5-4 victory over the A’s in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series. The Dodgers trailed the A’s, 4-3, in the bottom of the ninth when the sore-kneed Gibson hit it out of the park and then made his memorable gimpy jaunt around the bases.


Jan. 28, 1972: A bust of Bob Hope is transported through Hollywood for retouching at a paint shop. 


Nov. 5, 1984: President Reagan speaks to a crowd of about 20,000 at Pierce College in Woodland Hills on the last campaign day for the 1984 presidential election.


April 26, 1982: Forrest J. Ackerman shows off a head from Frankenstein’s Bride, one of 300,000 pieces of science-fiction, horror and fantasy memorabilia in his Los Feliz home. He gave informal tours to the public but eventually had to sell most of his collection to pay bills.


March 3, 1980: A view of the wood structure inside the Spruce Goose from center to the hull tail section. The photo was taken during the first public viewing of the aircraft in more than 20 years. The Spruce Goose was moved to Long Beach and placed on display in a large dome next to the Queen Mary.


January 10, 1949: A winter storm moved into Southern California, dumping snow, sleet and ice all over the Los Angeles basin. All canyon roads in the Santa Monica Mountains were closed.


March 17, 1973: Heidi Hess, 9, runs to greet her father, Air Force Maj. Jay C. Hess, at March Air Force Base following his release by the North Vietnamese. Hess was a prisoner of war for more than five years after enemy fire downed his F-105 bomber.

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